An Eighteenth-Century Case of Hair Voided by Urine

binary options trading strategy youtube Posted on December 17, 2012 by - Collecting, Early Modern History, History of Medicine, Patients, Philosophical Transactions, Remedies, Royal Society

buy Tastylia Oral Strip online without prescription “Honourable Sir!” wrote Thomas Knight to Sloane in February 1737 (British Library, Sloane MS 4034, ff. 34-5). He wished Sloane’s advice on an “uncommon Case”—the discovery of hairs discharged by a man who suffered from a burning pain during urinating. Knight thoughtfully enclosed the matter in a pill box for Sloane’s examination.

opzionibinario The patient must have been in great pain as all the adjacent parts, internal and external, were swollen and irritated. He had tried bleeding, clysters, emulsions, and opiates, all to no avail; he was only relieved when he finally passed the “hairy Substance with the gritty Matter that adheres to it”. Importantly, the patient had “kept a strict Regimen” for many years because of gout and “incontinency of urine”. As part of his regimen, he regularly drank cow’s milk.

köpa sildenafil accord L. Beale, Kidney diseases, uinary deposits, 1869.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

strategie opzioni binarie con medie mobili Knight theorized that the fine hairs had come from the skin of some animal that had gotten into the patient’s body and then circulated through the body until reaching the renal glands. “It is more possible”, he thought, “that they were extraneous, than that they were generated in the Urinary Passages”. He recognised that the veins in the body were indeed very small, but damp hairs “become very flexible, pliable and susceptible of being contorted and of assuming any Figure”. Perhaps “some of the downy-hair about the [cow’s] Udder might got along with the Milk”.

binäre option kostenloser demoaccound The oddity of the story is itself intriguing, but so too is the afterlife of the letter and sample. The details noted on the back of the letter by Sloane (or on his behalf) suggest the process of cataloguing in his collections.

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24option auszahlung erfahrung Knight of Hair voided by Urine.

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opciones vinarias VIII IX A letter from Mr T Knight to Sir Hans Sloane

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buy Tastylia 20 mg The letter and/or the sample were kept and entered into one of the collections in 1738. The letter was also passed on to the Royal Society and it was published in Philosophical Transactions no. 460.

trading online con postepay So, what did the Royal Society make of Knight’s report? The Phil. Trans. editor in 1739, Cromwell Mortimer, remarked after the letter: “I doubt of these Substances being real Hairs; I imagine they are rather grumous Concretions, formed only in the Kidneys by being squeezed out of the excretory Ducts into the Pelvis”.

miglior broker trading binario Painful enough, in any case, but at least no need to fear drinking milk!

5 comments on “An Eighteenth-Century Case of Hair Voided by Urine

  1. Sally Frampton on

    Thanks for posting this Lisa! Really interesting stuff. Part of my research is on ovarian disease in the eighteenth century. There was a lot of debate about those ovaries found to contain teeth and hair (what we now call teratomas) and theories as to where the hair came from (and some indeed questioned whether it was “real” hair). Nice to link it up with cases like this!

    Reply
      • Sally Frampton on

        …up until the mid-18c there’s still some debate as to whether the teeth have been swallowed and somehow worked their way into the ovary. That’s my favourite!

        There’s a case about one of these ovaries sent to Sloane in 1706 actually. Definitely worth a read if it crosses your research path!

        Reply
        • Lisa Smith on

          That’s mine, too! As to how the woman would miss swallowing the teeth, well… I am familiar with the 1706 case and will be blogging about it at some point as a follow-up–there are a few others in the letters, too.

          Reply

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